Hello everyone, when asking about the FTR QA3, an interesting topic came up. Unified clans in Wargaming products – that is, all Wargaming products having unified clans. In effect, a clan of 300 people could have 100 tankers, 100 pilots and 100 warship captains – well, at least something like that. Is it actually a good idea? Well, at first it seemed like a no-brainer. Sure – it’s great to have everyone playing under “one roof”, regardless of the product. With the new Chat 2.0, WoT players will be able to talk to people playing WoWp and vice versa, so that’s cool too. But then I remembered my raiding days. For those who don’t know, I used to play World of Warcraft. Hardcore. Fun fact: I think I know Jingles from back then, if it is the same Jingles, then we played on the same server, he was an Alliance celebrity back then, I was just a regular Horde “grunt”. Could be another Jingles, but I think it’s the same guy. Anyway. If you never played WoW, let me explain what I mean: In PvE, there were cases of massive amounts of players getting together (“raids”) to take down enemy NPC’s (“bosses”). For such a raid (in those hardcore times), a leader had to raise 40 people (of a specific setup, eg. there had to be like 4 “tanks”, some healers, rest was DPS), organize them into one group and then command all of them to do exactly what was needed in order to win. I am sure you can see the parallels between raiding and clanwars now. This raid organization (“raid leading”, the person was referred to as RL or “raid leader”) took an enormous effort – and I mean that. As a result, almost all good raid leaders had very little life besides the game, or were borderline psychotic. Sometimes both. The famous “Onyxia raid” video is a prime example (the guy starts raging about halfway into the video). And this is not an extreme case, I played under one such guy too. * * Anyway, I’m getting to the point already. A part of raid leader’s job was to organize the group before the raid. That was a very nasty and tedious process (mostly because unless you were in one of the top 3 or so guilds on the server, you had constant problems finding decent tanks, healers and such, resulting in many good raid leaders being also main tanks). So, you’re a raid leader, you’re putting together a group, you have 60 people available, you need 40, you need last few spots, you keep asking in your guild – and what you get is “fuck nah man I am casual”. Even classleaders were driven crazy by this crap, reducing the overall morale in the guild (nothing worse than having 38 people idling in Orgrimmar, while you look for two more healers, two healers are online, but both say they are casual and don’t want to raid) – the raid leader starts raging, people get guildkicked etc. Not a positive thing. Back to unified Wargaming accounts: this is exactly the thing that is the problem with unified accounts. Let’s say you want to build a successful team for Company battles. From what I’ve seen, it’s much like raiding: you need to be hardcore, you need to know what you are doing, but you also need to have decent pool of recruits. So, imagine your team is almost – all you need are two more decent heavies. You have enough people online, so you ask in clanchat. Noone answers. So you start asking people individually. And following happens: You: “Hey man, we need two more guys for company, come on” He: “Dude, I’m playing Warplanes – see that little icon? Warplane player” You: “But you played World of Tanks a month ago! I know you have a T57! He: “World of Warplanes player now! Sod off.” I believe you see my point. This will not be an issue for the top 50 big Clanwars clans – they won’t have problem with this, since people join them to go hardcore. In WoW parallel, the best guilds also got rid of lazy ass “reservists” very quickly. But it might kill a clan that is not yet big, but its core wants to go more competitive. It will give players a good and quick excuse not to participate in clan activities – you’ll simply say you’re a WoWp player now. How do I know this will happen? Because that’s exactly what happened in World of Warcraft with mid-tier guilds, that tried to raid. Even if you try something easier for starters than going straight to the difficult raids, what you had was a core of players willing to go hardcore and then a bunch of casuals that raided when they were in the mood (and then a bunch of people who showed every now and then, completely casual). Whenever a guild created a “good excuse” to get out of raiding within one guild (for example a rank of “reservist”), people who actually WANTED to raid, but only (for example) on some bosses to get the loot they wanted asked to be transferred to reserve and whenever they were needed (and mid-tier guilds never had that many people to spare, so they were – just like mid-tier clans don’t generally have people to spare when it comes to companies) they just went like “aw man, I’m reserve, can’t you see?” – so the obvious solution was to create the (usually clumsy) DKP systems (pointless in WoT I think) or (very common) for big guilds to create reservist sub-guilds. This caused another unwanted effect that the reservists (who – being casual – usually formed the “chatty guildchat core” of the guild, making the guild chat live with jokes and such) were moved somewhere else and the guild sort of “lost its soul”, but that’s a story for another time. Solution So, if I was to conclude this entire line of thought, I think just unifying the clans with players from all games in them is in best case pointless, in worst case counterproductive for clans, that want to go “hardcore”, but are facing personell issues. However, what COULD be done (and what I think is a better solution) would be to create separate clans under all three games and at the same to allow their unification under some sort of social superstructure (let’s call it “army”). An “army” would be a “superclan”, consisting of 2 to n (n being the number of WG products unified in the “army” system) clans with common gold “army” Continue reading →

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