Source: http://www.inven.co.kr/webzine/news/...4&site=wot Hello everyone, those of you who read FTR regularily are probably familiar with Daigensui, who helped bring us the Japanese branch. What follows is the translation (by a native speaker, but the English has some typos, tried to fix as much as possible) of a Korean interview with her. Enjoy. There are many that say “cool” when looking at tanks, but few would say “loveable”. This is particularly so if one does not put anime skins or girl crew members. This might be possible among the so-called “military otakus”, but it was difficult to find someone close to this reporter who had such love for tanks. Here, there is someone who calls tanks “my cute daughters” and shows her love. This might seem a bit of an exhaggeration, but one you look into it things make sense. Daigensui is the “Mother” of the Japanese tanks which will appear in the WoT 8.10 update. Daigensui was also once a regular WoT player, but now she works as an outside research advisor to Wargaming on Japanese and German tanks. Particularly, she had a core role in the development of the Japanese tree, to the point she can call the tanks her “daughters”. In 8.10 there will be only a light and medium line for the Japanese tree, but in the future there will also be heavies, tank destroyers, and self-propelled guns, all of which will also be researched with Daigensui at the front. Meeting Sumeragi “Daigensui” Akeiko, Wargaming Outside Research Advisor Q: Nice to meet you. Please introduce yourself to our WoT Inven family. Sumeragi: Greetings. I’m Sumeragi, who plays on the North America server as Daigensui. I usually am active on the NA forums and Naver Cafe. Q: Can you please tell us what you do at Wargaming? Sumeragi: I’m not an actual employee so there is no exact position, so you can think of me as a freelancer researcher. I usually focus on Japanese research, but also helped out in German, in the 0.8.8 update. Q: You have knowledge of tanks which seem to go beyond the experts, how did you start researching tanks? Sumeragi: I’m not a military maniac (at least, I don’t think so), but both sides of my family are related to the military or military industry, so naturally it became part of my life. I’m nothing when compared to GuP’s Yukari. If there is something particular, it’s that I moved quite a bit of the various resources I collected since I was young into an external hard drive. Q: Even though you’re not a Wargaming employee, you’re known has having a core role in development of new tanks. We’re curious as to how you came into that position. Sumeragi: I was active in a Japanese tank thread over at the NA forums, and then The_Chieftain introduced me to WG Minsk. From that time on I was in direct communication and helping out. Q: If we look at the material Sumeragi has given to Wargaminig we see blueprints, records and other such various sources. We wish to know how you managed to gather these materials. There might be a bit of classified information among those as well. Sumeragi: Most of the time I looked through Mitsubishi and IJA records with help from various contacts, and also received help from researchers through my family. Fortunately, information on Type 74 wa partly declassified, and JGSDF was kind enough to make some materials suitable for research. Q: While it is known that Wargaming has great emphasis on historical accuracy, they do change some specifications for balance. There would be clashes between the historical accuracy research by Sumeragi and game balance considerations by Wargaming, and in this case, which comes first? Sumeragi: There are hard history and soft balancing, and accuracy is given priority as much as possible. However in cases where no amount of soft balancing would help (prime example being the VK 45.02 (P) series), Wargaming sticks to physics and goes with “what would have been done”. Of course, this is the last resort. 8.10 Update, Her Talk of Japanese Tanks The start of how Sumeragi participates in Wargaming development, Japanese tanks. The first result was the premium tnak Chi-Nu Kai which appeared in 8.9, and 8.10 brings the main tree. However, with the bad reputations as low-quality that Japanese tanks have, there is also the historical feelings which results in a not so good first impression. No matter how tanks might come to life with historical accuracy, from the players’ point of view the potential and ability in the game is the most important. In this sense Japanese tanks (when compared to the second German TD line) do not have any clear advantages or potential. But when the specifications of the new Tier X Japanese medium was released, there hae been some who think of it as a high-spec medium tank capable of standing in for Leopard 1 or T-62A. There have been rumors that Sumeragi appealed a lot to Wargaming in order to add the latest developed tank STB-1 as Tier X (Daigensui adds: Not really, I was pushing for Type 74 which was denied as too modern even if the specs were less). Q: The date for 8.10 update has been decided. We’ll be soon able to meet the Japanese tree, and we would like it if you could tell us the general characteristics of the tree. Sumeragi: If we summarize the suggestions that I sent, - Relatively good camouflage and terrain passibility (acceleration might be slow but general mobility is good) - Slightly higher alpha compared to same-caliber guns of other nations - Except for a few exceptions gun depression of at least -10 degrees Q: There have been generalizaions that Japanese tanks have been historically unable to do their full role when compared to other nations. Especially, there are theories that the quality of armor and rounds were subpar. Sumeragi: Since the main opponent was a practically armor-less China, it can be said that the priority of tank development being low was a major factor. Aside from this, there was the technological deficiency and lack of resources and most importantly the limited industrial capacity. This mean that production fell by itself, and IJA headquarters would use this as an excuse to focus on spirital mobilization and manpower to fight wars. It was only when the IJN was virtually eliminated and the various workers moved to the army that quality went up a bit. In addition, in the case of Mitsubishi’s type 4 Chi-To development, they ignored the IJA’s (subpar) requirements on materials and also was planning to use company resources to start production. Continue reading →

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