Hello everyone, Wargaming usually presents us with articles, that are kinda nice. For example the history of the British flamethrower tanks (was it by Listy? I think so) – or Challenger’s historical posts. Every now and then however, they have what Rita would probably call a “brain fart” and just copy stuff from Russian portal. Needless to say, that is not a good idea. For all their vaunted “remember history” campaigns, what Wargaming generally means is “remember Russian history”. SerB wrote it himself: if you want to do business in Russia, you have to be patriotic. No “we are all equal” – it’s more like “Russia stronk”. This of course comes with a “price” of having the historical post somewhat biased. I actually hate the word “biased”, but I guess it describes the situation best. This is not the first time Wargaming EU did this (some of you odlschool players might remember the Kliment Voroshilov weekend), but it’s not very common, thanks god. With that being said, the recent Karelia article was one of those outrageous articles, that were written from Soviet perspective. It reminded me of a thing I’ve read recently somewhere on the internet: “Those imperialist dogs have only one toilet per room, but here in Soviet Russia, we have TWO toilets per room! Soviet Russia is victorious once again!” Nah, I don’t have anything against Russians obviously, but this stuff makes me pissed. Let’s have a look at the article itself: However, more conflict was to come. When Germany invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941, the opportunist Finns took their chance to strike back as well. This would be known as the Continuation War. In just three months, the Finns had pushed all the way back through Karelia, halting at the original border. They held this point for the next two and a half years. OPPORTUNIST Finns? Really? So you steal a part of the country that isn’t yours and when the owners try to take it back, you call them “opportunists”? Shame on those opportunist Czech and Polish resistance members then for attempting to fight the nazi (and Soviet) occupants. On 26th November 1939 a border incident resulted in artillery shots seemingly being fired at Soviet troops. The result was the suspension of all non-aggression pacts between the USSR and Finland two days later. To date, it is suspected that this incident was staged by the Soviets, although full proof has never emerged. Well, wikipedia seems to think otherwise. Those evil, evil Finnish, shelling the poor Russians… At this point, I checked the discussion and of course, this picture just had to appear :) The truth is, the war was a complete disaster for the Soviets. Unprepared for the harsh weather, unable to cope with the Finnish guerilla tactics and poorly trained, they were completely decimated by the Finnish resistance and managed to advance only with horrendous casualities (something Soviet Russia was never afraid of). Note that even the Russians admit that no war was ever declared, making the invasion essentially a war crime, but somehow, noone seems to be bothered by that fact. The article also mentions the Finnish allying with the Germans (conveniently omitting the fact that by that time, the Germans were the allies of the Soviets as well). Now, the discussion under the article is much more interesting than the article itself and since I am no expert on Finnish history, I am going to copypaste one post from a player named AngelofAwe, explaining some of the mistakes in the article (fixed the obvious typos). - the Soviet Union didn’t just demand Karelia, but also the islands south of Finland and a naval base on Hanko, next to the Finnish capital Helsinki! Who in their right mind would accept that? Especially after the Soviets did the same thing to the Baltic states and then proceeded to completely occupy them – which was also the ultimate goal in Finland. The soviets even established a Soviet friendly new “finnish government” in Karelia to place in Helsinki once they had conquered the nation (SS: this is true, these were later viewed as traitors). Marskin_ryyppy adds the following: “You didn’t mention that Finland would also have to destroy all existing fortifications on the Karelian Isthmus, even those which would be left in the Finnish side. I think especially this demand states what Stalin really had in his mind. The annexation of Finland.” - the shelling of Mainila is not just “suspected” to have been staged by the Soviets, it’s been proven and even the Soviets themselves finally admitted they started the Winter War a couple of decades ago. - “For a whole month, the Finns managed to stall the Soviets, slowing down their advance, but by the end of December they had fallen back to the Mannerheim Line and held them there for several weeks. This caused humiliation for the Soviet army and Stalin” It talks about the war as if the Finns put up some resistance, but the glorious Red Army eventually beat them anyway and focuses on the Mannerheim line. Meanwhile, it ignores the action north of Ladoga, where the actual huge battles and defeats of the Red Army took place, such as the Raate Road, where just 400 Finnish troops halted the advance of 2 mechanized Soviet divisions long enough for (still outnumbered) Finnish troops to catch up, cut the soviet columns into pockets and annihilate them completely one after another. The soviet commanders in charge retreated and fled only to immediately be executed for the disastrous failure once they reached Soviet lines. - “One by one, the Finnish defensive fortifications began to fall, although not without a cost to the invaders – Soviet casualties were high.” Technically not true at all. The Finnish lines only broke after the Soviets focused everything they had on the Mannerheim line and bombarded it day and night along the 100km front with massive amounts of artillery. On the day of the breakthrough, the Mannerheim line was hit by 300,000 artillery shells within 24 hours – several times more than the finnish artillery fired in the entire war. - “On 11 February, the Soviets had about 460,000 men, over 3,350 artillery pieces, about 3,000 tanks and about 1,300 aircraft deployed on the Karelian Isthmus. The Red Army was constantly receiving new recruits after the breakthrough. Opposing them the Finns had eight divisions, totalling about 150,000 men.” Remember also that these 150,000 Finns had fought for 3 months with little rest and no reserves to switch with, meaning they were exhausted, not to mention that the Finns were out of ammunition and the artillery had been ordered not Continue reading →

More...