Hello everyone, as some of you know, I recently joined the R1SE clan after its’ commander’s invitation – to try the Clanwars I heard so much about on my own skin so to say. So, here are a few impressions of mine about this mode after like two weeks in the clan. Obviously, this post is not meant for experienced CW players, who know all of this very well, but for people, who never played CW and are actually considering trying it. To be fair, my experience was tainted by the fact that for two weeks already, I have flu or something and trying to focus your enemy while coughing your lungs out is probably not the best thing ever. Anyway, as for the CW… After joining the clan and reading up on the stuff people have written on CW’s (and going – victoriously – through my first two battles), my first impression was: “I know this!”. Yep, CW mode is in a way very similiar to World of Warcraft raiding (again: I left WoW many years ago, so I am referring to the state it was back then, vanilla and TBC raiding was pretty hardcore). A bit easier maybe for the “grunts” and a bit harder for the commanders, but the basic elements are completely the same. - you need a proper tank, just like you needed a proper class in WoW. FV4202 in CW? No, sir (just like you wouldn’t let a shadowpriest heal the raid back then). The choice of tanks seems not that diverse: in heavies, T110E5 seems to dominate, in mediums it’s the Russian medium tanks and also Foch tank destroyers. However, these setups are not universal, they are map-dependent (I was quite surprised by the Province map setup R1SE uses). Obviously, these choices are made by the battle commander and are mandatory, just like in a raid. - you need a proper crew skills, proper equipment and proper consumables. In WoW, you needed a proper build and equipment as well. I was actually surprised it is this strict, because I had a “general” idea of what works in random battles, but that does not actually have to be the same for CW’s (had to reset the skills on my T-62A crew). Again, these things are mandatory (just like a WoW raid leader wouldn’t let anyone with PVP gear raid, at least not back then). - the same basic principle: a battle with an enemy, where the leader commands his force via some voice service (mostly Teamspeak) and the “grunts” do what he says. Here, it’s a bit different, because from what I gathered, most of the “burden” lies on the team leader. You see, in World of Warcraft, unless you wanted to be like one of the first clans to kill a boss in the world, you didn’t NEED to make up tactics, you just read them on the internet. Your job was to explain the tactics to the team and to see that everyone understands them and does what he’s told. In CW, the leader actually has to make the tactics and if he chooses wrongly, the team is fucked. AND to top it off, he has to keep an eye on the team, to direct the situation AND to fight. Pretty tough job. In this sense, I think the leader’s job in CW is harder than leader’s job in WoW and the clan stands and falls with a good leader. If you actually don’t have a dedicated person (or more!) to lead the battles, a person who will sit for hours, studying tactics and reading up on… well, pretty much everything, forget CW, you won’t succeed and it will be a waste of your time. I know this firsthand actually, some time ago, I was a casual part of a small Czech clan, they tried to land several times, but the attempts were half-assed with pretty much no leading (“let’s play it like random”) and the results were a disaster (unless – once or twice – we ran into even worse teams). Complete waste of time. - related to the post above, CW are harder for a leader, yes, but they are actually easier for a “grunt”, because they are a bit more forgiving. You can get hit and the shell might bounce. Or the other guy might miss “thanks” to RNG. Or you might not get spotted because of some random element noone predicts. In other words, if you make a mistake, you might survive it. WoW raiding was different: you make mistake (overaggro, don’t move when you are supposed to), you are dead and when you are dead, the team is usually dead too. Tank dies? Team gone. Healer dies? Team gone. DPS dies? Well, that might not be completely fatal, but it often is (enrage timers, DPS race bosses etc.). In other words: a really good commander with a team of average players (who however listen to orders and fulfill them to the letter) has much higher chance in WoT than in WoW, because the players (apart from some dedicated special roles) do not have as much individual responsibility as in WoW. Naturally, this is arguable and it is my personal impression only. - mods, while desired, are (unlike in WoW) not needed to play. You can succeed in CW without mods, while in World of Warcraft, going on a raid without a mod called DeadlyBossMods was a suicide (and a reason to be kicked from the raid). Other mods were pretty much compulsory as well (for my paladin it was the Pallypower mod for example). What both WoT and WoW have in common is obviously the human element: clan rivalry, “feuds”, friendships (alliances) and all that. WoW was easier in the way that there was no need for diplomacy (unless there was some very specific situation to be resolved), whole in CW, diplomacy seems to be just as important as the battles themselves. You can’t survive alone, you need friends (or at least “brother” clans) and you apparently can’t survive making too many enemies either. As for the battles themselves – again, lot like raiding. Team leader commands, you obey, simple as that. When it gets you in contact with the enemy, you do your best, when it doesn’t – tough luck. In this sense, I found it hard in two or three cases to actually impact the battle AND listen to orders. I was stationed at one spot as a “lookout”, while the rest of the team fought the other team. And order is an order, but I ended up doing very little damage in the process, a Continue reading →

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