Hello everyone, what follows is the test, performed by the Romanian EU server player Am3r1knu, who decided it would be actually interesting to see how WoT performs when running from a SSD and how it performs when running from a HDD and whether it affects the game FPS. Here are his findings. It gets a bit technical, so I guess this post is aimed at people, who understand what Am3r1knu is actually saying. World of Tanks disk usage test (comparisson between Hard Disk Drive and a Solid State Drive) Computer and software used PC configuration (phase 1): Intel i5 760 @ 2.8ghz nVidia GTX 760, 2gb, EVGA SuperClocked edition 8gb DDR3 1333mhz Asus Xonar DX OS HDD: Western Digital Caviar Black, 250gb, S-ATA II Game HDD: Western Digital Caviar Black, 500gb, S-ATA II PC configuration (phase 2): Intel i5 760 @ 2.8ghz nVidia GTX 760, 2gb, EVGA SuperClocked edition 8gb DDR3 1333mhz Asus Xonar DX OS and Game SSD: Samsung 840 EVO 120gb Software used (phase 1 and 2): Windows 7 Ultimate, 64bit nVidia Forceware 335.23 WHQL CrystalDiskMark 3.0.3b Fraps 3.5.9 Windows Resource Monitor World of Tanks 9.0 with the latest hotfix AND “res/awesomium” renamed Test details (phase 1 and 2): 1. The storage mediums (HDD and SSD) are tested with the CrystalDiskMark software for relevant figures regarding the data transfer rates (read/write speeds). The fields we are interested in are the 4K line. That line refers to the random reading/writing of small files that are located in various locations on the drive. 2. Two passes over each demo, that start from second 29 at the beginning countdown until the ending message is displayed. The passes will be monitored with Fraps’ built-in benchmarking tool, noting the minimum, average and maximum frames per second. 3. View in the Resource Monitor the disk activity while running the game in windowed mode (for real-time viewing) for three passes over replay 1. HDD results The testing of the above-mentioned game HDD is as follows: As we can see, the random access of a file from a random location on the HDD has less than half of 1 MB of reading speed and almost 1 MB of writing speed. Onwards to the benchmarking of the game. FPS results (HDD) (replay 1) Pass 1 had: Average 47, Minimum 23, Maximum 71 (replay 1) Pass 2 had: Average 47, Minimum 25, Maximum 71 (replay 2) Pass 1 had: Average 63, Minimum 37, Maximum 87 (replay 2) Pass 1 had: Average 63, Minimum 39, Maximum 86 Resource monitor results (HDD) During the three passes over replay 1, a significant spike in the disk activity was noticed every time the player’s tank took a hit from a high explosive round (HE and HEAT have identical effects). During replay 1, this occurs at 9:33. This could be noticed by the sudden spike from ~50 kb/s to over 1 mb/s, that caused a mini-freeze and it wasn’t recorded by Fraps. The exact moment is below SSD results The testing of the above-mentioned SSD is as follows: As we can see, the random access of a file from a random location on the HDD has 35 MB of reading speed and almost 222 MB of writing speed, thus it is significantly faster than a regular HDD. Onwards to the benchmarking of the game. FPS results (SSD) (replay 1) Pass 1 had: Average 55, Minimum 28, Maximum 87 (replay 1) Pass 2 had: Average 54, Minimum 29, Maximum 86 (replay 2) Pass 1 had: Average 74, Minimum 42, Maximum 107 (replay 2) Pass 1 had: Average 75, Minimum 40, Maximum 112 Resource monitor results (SSD) During the three passes over replay 1, the same spikes in disk usage were noticed but no freezes were present due to the higher transfer speed of the SSD. Conclusions The switch from a HDD to an SSD produced a 16% increase in the average FPS, 12.5% in the minimum FPS and a 21% increase in the maximum FPS. This means that the game does a terrible job at utilizing the user’s available RAM and relies on the storage device (HDD or SSD) to get the information required. This is perhaps a method to make the game compatible with low-end PC’s that have a small amount of RAM, by pulling data directly from the HDD, but it becomes a burden on more powerful computers that have a lot of RAM at their disposal and thus stressing the weakest component in a computer: the HDD. A quick and guarrantee remedy for the above issue would be the switch to an SSD and run the OS and game from it. Another method, that doesn’t involve the purchase of an SSD, would be the defragmenting of the HDD, the checking for errors of the HDD and making sure that no unnecesarry programs run in the background, like listening to music on Winamp or filming with Fraps. Replay 1 used can be found here Replay 2 used can be found here

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