Author: sp15 (US server) The list of previous parts is at the bottom of the article. Recently, I covered the development of the S-tank as a part of the Swedish tank series here on FTR and today, I’m going to explain how I think the S-tank could work in WoT. First of all, I’d like to start by saying that despite Wargaming’s stance towards the S-tank in the past, there has definitely been an interest in it and I think there might be a higher chance to see the vehicle in the game than you might expect. Anyhow, lets get started. Technical problems Due to the unique nature of the fixed gun, a couple of issues would need to be addressed to make the tank work properly in WoT. 1) hull depression/elevation: in the game, we currently have hulls, that react with their suspension on acceleration, breaking or obstacles, so I don’t see why this couldn’t be taken further for the S-tank. Specifically, when the tank is stationary (or possibly moving at slow speed as well), it would be able to move its hull up and down and have its suspension move with the hull like it already does when you are driving. However, while on the move, controlling the hull elevation wouldn’t be possible (unless you are just turning on the spot) and the hull would go to a default position – this is actually pretty much how it worked on the real thing and is one of the main reasons the tank couldn’t fire on the move. 2) aiming with the fixed gun: I don’t think that aiming to the side with a fixed gun would be a big problem in terms of the game mechanics, the aiming would be controlled like a turret but with the whole hull moving instead of just a turret. Of course, the WASD controls would override the turning of the hull to the mouse pointer position, but other than that, it would work like a turret in first and third person. There are already mechanics that move the hull of vehicles with limited gun traverse towards where you are pointing, if it’s outside of your field of traverse, so I don’t think this should be a big problem. 3) Spotting mechanics: This is perhaps the biggest issue, but it should hopefully not pose too much of a problem. For those of you, who don’t know, the WoT spotting system and a lot of the equipment you can mount on the tank detect if your tank is moving or not and based on that, a number of things can happen. In the case of the spotting system, you lose 50% of your camo rating and are therefore easier to spot. Due to the fact the S-tank has to move its hull every time it aims its gun, this poses a problem. My personal suggestion is to go the easy way and simply give the tank a very good camouflage on the move rating and simply not make equipment (like camo nets and binoculars) that makes use of the tank standing still available. Some of this can be compensated by an already historically good camo rating (in real life, it had smaller silhouette than all other MB’Ts of the time) and view range (it outperformed the Leopard 1 and Chieftain in various tests). Strv 103 preproduction model compared to a Centurion Strv 103B at maximum depression (-10dg) Balance I mentioned this issue a bit already with the the camo rating and view range above, but now I will move on to the rest of the tank. Mobility: mobility is one of the biggest issues I have with the S-tank – or rather with its first production version, the Strv 103A. Historically, the Strv 103A was equipped with two engines – one diesel and one gas turbine, that combined to give the 37 ton tank 540 horsepower and a power to weight ratio of about 14,6hp/t. It was however found several years before production started that a more powerful engine was needed and several engine combinations were considered and tested. One of these was to simply replace the gas turbine with a more powerful one, which resulted in a combined 730hp. This engine configuration was refitted to the Strv 103A as a part of its refit to the Strv 103B standard in 1970, three years after the original entered service. With this engine upgrade as a researchable module, the tank could get some much needed mobility (19hp/t) without the need for a soft stat compensation. Firepower: This is a tricky topic to cover, since WoT does not really represent any modern autoloaders like the S-tank. You see, in the S-tank, the autoloader is fed by a combination of three magazines – one 25 round, one 20 round and with final 5 rounds for smoke. This means that the total of 50 rounds of ammo can be carried and in WoT terms (which usually halves the real life value of the clip), the smallest practical magazine would be 10 rounds. I think that this can work and can be balanced, but I don’t really think it fully represents the S-tank, since there will be a long reload time for the magazine, which was something that wasn’t necessary on the S-tank, since all the 50 rounds were carried together and the loader could simply press a button to switch magazines. With this in mind, the second alternative would be to give the tank what would be treated as a regular gun but with massive DPM. This would mean no long magazine reloads, but would also mean the lack of the autoloader burst damage. With the autoloader burst damage, we would get 3900 damage (390 average x10) to dish out with a 3 sec reload between every shot and a minute long magazine reload. The other option with DPM would be to give the tank something like 8 rounds per minute rate of fire, which would give it 3120 damage per minute (think tier 10 E25). I want you to keep in mind that these numbers are just speculation and the tank could might as well be balanced with a lower rate of fire or a smaller magazine. In any case, the main armament of the Strv 103A was a modified version of the British L7 gun with a lengthened barrel, in Swedish service it was called 10,5cm Kan Strv 103. In the game, it should have the same 390 average damage as the L7, but with greater penetration, equal to other tier 10 TDs due to the longer barrel and greater muzzle velocity. Armor: this was actually covered Continue reading →

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