Author: Karika In my previous article, we examined the main aspects and problems with the Hungarian tech tree, which could look something like this in the future as a part of the European tech tree: From now on, I’ll show you how could these Hungarian tanks and tank destroyers perform in World of Tanks with their historical characteristics. But, before I start, I must note that I could/would not and predict game parameters like the vehicle health pool (HP), or gun alpha damage, because these are the aspects of in-game balance, and I’m not an expert in that. This applies also to the historical attributes, which are sacrificed to vehicle balance, such as the reload time, rate of fire (RoF), hull/turret traverse speed, terrain passability, radio signal range, and so on. These so not or only rarely correspond to their real life equivalents. Consequently, properties like historical RoF or the type (or even existence) of the radio does not really matter from now on, but I’ll write them down anyway. The armor penetration values are in WoT terms, thus how much armor would they penetrate in 90° at 100m distance with standard armor piercing (AP) rounds. And lastly, I am not going to predict whether any of these tanks would be “good” or “bad”. These are very subjective terms and it is way too early right now to decide this. Now, let’s take a closer look at the Hungarian light tank candidates! As I mentioned previously, Tier 1 in the EU tree is problematic and it is not yet decided how will Wargaming solve this issue. However, there are two major candidates for the Hungarian tier 1 tank, but both of them could be used as tier 2s, if WG decides some other way. V-3 – Tier I regular or Tier II premium/gift Above: The early, turretless V-3 prototype Above: Illustration, how could the V-3 with the early V-4 turret at the late stage of its development look like Above: The modified British version of the V-3, also known as Alvis-Straussler Light-Medium Tank Possible vehicle description One of the first Hungarian attempts to create a wheel-cum-truck convertible and amphibious tank. Developed by Nicholas (Miklós) Straussler, Hungarian-born English designer in cooperation with the Hungarian Weiss Manfréd firm for a tender by the British Army. Two prototype chassis were made in 1936, one for the British Army, and another one secretly for the Royal Hungarian Army. After the trials, the Hungarian V-3 chassis recieved a provisional turret and the concept was further developed to the V-4. History: You can read about the history of the Straussler tanks here: http://ftr.wot-news.com/2013/11/05/hung … ler-tanks/ Characteristics: Crew: 3, Commander, Gunner, Driver Gun: 40mm 37 M. Ammo types: AP, HE Ammo capacity: ? Penetration with AP: approx. 60mm Gun depression, elevation: ? Armor: 26/13/9 Stock turret: Alvis-Straussler Light-Medium Turret armor: ? Elite turret: V-4 early Turret armor: ? Weight: 10 t Engines: - WM V3, petrol, 100 hp - WM V3/2 (WM A.C. II), petrol, 110-120 hp - Alvis, petrol, 145 hp Power-to-weight ratio: 14,5 hp/t Maximum speed on tracks: 36 km/h Radio: none Notes and predictable in-game performance: This tank was only amphibious with attached pontoons, so it can be implemented to the game as a regular light tank without them. I have limited data about the further fate of the British V-3 prototype (also referred to sometimes as Alvis-Straussler Light-Medium Tank) right now. I do not know if anything else (such as armor thickness, gun, etc.) was modified on it, except its suspension. I also do not know yet which turret was “better”, I assume the provisional V-4 turret might be, because it was designed a bit later than the British turret. But I have to note, that I’m not sure about many things of these tanks. I do not know the exact name or type of the British Alvis engine yet. Pros: (for tier 1) - Good front armor - Good gun (if too good, can be balanced with bad soft stats) - Probably good gun depression - Decent power-to-weight ratio Cons: (for tier 1) - Probably bad soft stats? - Only one historical armament - Possibly would be replaced with something else at tier 1 Turreted 35M. Ansaldo experiment – Tier I regular or Tier II premium/gift Possible vehicle description An experiment from 1936 to upgrade the attack and self-defense capability of the 35M. Ansaldo tankette with a rotating turret. Comparative trials showed that this turretted Ansaldo had many issues and was inferior to the original Ansaldo tankette in many aspects and thus, the development was halted. Only one prototype was made. History: You can read about the history of the Ansaldo experiments here: http://ftr.wot-news.com/2014/07/30/on-t … o-and-wot/ Characteristics: Crew: 2, Commander/Gunner, Driver Gun: 2x 8mm 34/37A M. Gebauer machine gun This gun is just too weak! Gun: 12,7mm 40 M. Gebauer GMK heavy machine gun Ammo types: ? Ammo capacity: ? Shells in magazine: ? Theoretic RoF: cca. 900-1000 shots/min Penetration with AP: ? (probably somewhat less than 27mm) Gun depression, elevation: ? Armor: 13/8/6 Turret: Experimental turret Turret armor: ? Weight: approx. 3,4 t Engine: Fiat CV 3-005, petrol, 45 hp Power-to-weight ratio: approx. 13,2 hp/t Maximum speed: 38 km/h Radio: none Notes and predictable in-game performance: This tank has many issues, it’s questionable if it would made it in the game at all. Historically the 8mm Gebauer twin machine gun only fired infantry rounds and no armor-piercing (AP) ammo was in service for it amongst the ground forces. However, unhistorically, it could get AP rounds from the 8mm guns of the Royal Hungarian Air Force, but it would be still too under powered for in-game use. Do not compare this gun to the 7,92mm Mauser E.W. 141 machine gun of the in-game Pz. I C, that is a special, fully automatic anti-tank machine gun, while the 8mm Gebauer was just a regular infantry one, designed to be used against live forces. It is unsuited to fight/penetrate tanks. The exact rate of fire (ROF) of the 12,7mm 40 M. Gebauer is unknown, but because it was practically the same gun as the 8mm 26/31 M. Gebauer motor driven machine gun in larger caliber, we can speculate that it had similar, high ROF. Unfortunately, the size of the magazine or ammo belt of the 12,7mm gun used in the experiment is also not known. The ammunition for this gun would be probably imported Italian 12,7mm AP and HEIT (High-Explosive-Incendiary-Tracer) rounds. There aren’t any photographs or bluebrints about this tankette published yet, only descriptions. It’s not known how exactly its turret looked like, only that it was mounted on the left side of the vehicle. Continue reading →

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