Author: sp15 Hi everyone, as you might know, I’m sp15, one of the volunteer researchers for the EU tree and the author behind the Swedish tanks series here on FTR. Today, I want to talk about the prospect of the Swedish branch or even tech tree and how it could work in World of Tanks. A Swedish tech tree? Unlike the other European nations, Sweden meets the requirements set for a full tech tree implementation, which simply means that there are enough tanks to reach tier 10 in every tank class (except light tanks). I don’t necessarily think that this requirement represents WG’s current view on the matter, since things like the size of the market needs to be taken into account, but in any case, it is certain that we will see Swedish tanks in the game either as part of the EU tree or as a separate nation. Here is my interpretation of how a Swedish tree could look: Tank designs by the nation of Sweden have been shaped by the need to keep up with larger, more powerful nations like Germany and Russia with limited amount of resources and the emphasis on mobility over armor and firepower. In general, Swedish tank designs have very low weights and are also in many cases smaller, compared to their counterparts. The armor of these designs is often decent frontally, but very bad on the sides and rear, which means you will have to use their good mobility to avoid hits. When it comes to firepower, Sweden has an interesting mix of options: at the low-mid tiers, the guns are conventional ones with decent firepower, penetration and good gun depression, but on the mid-high tiers, you start getting the option to mount autoloaders on some vehicles like the Strv m/42 at tier 5 or the tier 6 and 7 artillery. In comparison with the nations already in the game, Swedish tanks can be described as a blend between French tanks with good mobility and autoloaders and American tanks with good gun depression and decent frontal armor. Light line Swedish light tanks are generally slower than other nations, but tend to get bigger guns. They could also get better mobility to make up for their lower top speed. The armor of these tanks is generally quite poor, but there are some exceptions at low-mid tiers, that have good turret armor. We don’t have a lot of really solid data on it, but the line is to end with the Lansen 25 ton, which was the last Swedish attempt for a light tank in the 1950s. It can be described as a long range sniper with its powerful 10,5cm gun, but with bad mobility (for a light tank) with only 65kph top speed and only a 450hp engine. One last thing I should mention before I move on is that the line ends at tier 9 with the Strv T medium tank and ties in with the medium line at tier X. Lansen 25t with the long 10,5cm gun Medium line Swedish medium tanks have a mix of interesting characteristics. The low tiers are generally unremarkable, but at mid tiers, you get a blend of good gun depression, mobility and some really interesting gun choices. For instance the tier 7 Strv Leo is likely to get a 10,5cm gun, that should be on par with the 10cm on the Chinese T-34-1, but with slightly better alpha damage and worse RoF. In general, the armor on Swedish medium tanks is passable at best, with decent frontal armor but bad side and rears you need to use your mobility and remember to point your front towards the enemy at all times. There are however several exceptions at high tiers with the Strv K, which shares the hull with the tier X heavy and has up to 145mm of armor on the lower glacis and 95 at a very steep angle on the upper. However, side and rear armor are still very bad. At tier X you will unlock the Strv A, which was a projected medium tank, that was in development alongside the S-tank. It can be described as a cross between Batchat 25t and M48 Patton. Strv A has armor in line with the rest of the branch, at 120/50/50 it’s not great, but not terrible either. It however only has 100/60/50 turret armor and -7dg gun depression, which is worse than all the previous tanks in the medium line. To make up for this it has pretty good mobility at 17hp/t and it also gets an autoloader, this should lead to a very interesting play style that would be unique among high tier mediums My interpretation of the Strv A based on this armor scheme One additional thing I should address about the Medium line is that currently, tier 8 is occupied by the Strv 81, which was the Swedish designation for the Centurion Mk 3 & 5. Sadly, we currently have no other candidate for that spot. In the game it should be almost identical to the British Centurion Mk 1 but without the top engine and with the 20pdr type B at tier 8. Heavy line The Swedish heavy line starts at tier 8 from the medium line with the EMIL 1951 and focuses on frontally well armored and also well-armed but also fast heavy tanks. Their major weakness is the lack of side and rear armor and long reload times for the autoloader magazines. In general, the Swedish heavies should play like slower and less mobile versions of the French heavies, but with more frontal armor and with a smaller size and weight. In fact, the Swedish heavies are so light that anything bigger than a light tank can potentially be a serious threat when it comes to ramming. Another thing Swedish heavies excel at is gun depression with all of the heavies having more than -10dg of gun depression, but this comes at a price and gun elevation is usually very poor. When it comes to armor, the front is usually good with thick armor at steep angles. For example on tier X, the “Kranvagn” heavy tank has a hull armor of 145/40/40 and turret armor of 170/70/40, which should be enough to bounce most tier 9 and 8 shells, and when you consider the -12dg gun depression, you get a very competitive vehicle. The tier 8 EMIL 1951 tank, as modelled by Brokenstar from the US forums Tank destroyer line Sweden, can actually produce two very unique and different TD lines. The first and more conventional line is based on various Swedish assault gun and TD projects at early Continue reading →

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