SS: Continuing from where we left off, JD made a new interview – this time with the popular streamer Jingles! Enjoy. 1. Jingles, what playstyle do you utilize? Depends entirely on what I’m driving, what the map is and what’s on the opposition. I do tend to prefer the faster machines, but I’ve noticed lately that I tend to use the speed to get into good forward positions and ambush enemies rather than dogfight with them like other people would in the same tank. I seem to be a camper at heart, but I’m a camper who likes to camp as far forward as possible with the option of retreating quickly if I need to. Having said that, I’ll do whatever the situation requires, but there are certain styles that I just seem to settle more naturally into. 2. So, what is your favorite tank? I’ve had a number of favourite tanks. It used to be the Marder II until it finally got nerfed to death, it’s still the machine I’ve played the most games on with the highest win rate (334 games 67%). I don’t tend to focus on any one tank, if you look up my stats you’ll see that I play most tanks more or less equally, with an average number of battles in all of them. I’d have to say that lately I’m really falling in love with the M46 Patton, though. I love all of the tier 9 machines, as a group I think they’re the best tanks and TDs in the game. The Patton, however, hits that sweet spot of speed, agility and a really powerful gun that I love. 3. What made you start making videos on youtube? Initially it was just as a way of saving my favourite World of Tanks games. Shortly afterwards I started saving my old version of WOT instead of overwriting it as each new patch came out, and that allowed me to continue viewing old replays. I kept on doing the video commentaries because I found I enjoyed doing them, largely inspired by other YouTubers like Pandy, HighFlyer15 and Quickybaby. Pretty soon I started getting appreciative comments, and that encouraged me to do more, which led to more comments, more subscribers and so on and so on. When I started getting my very own haters, trolls and serial downvoters I knew I’d made it at last. ;) 4. Did the fact that you were publishing videos of you playing WOT make you more cautious on how you played or how you performed? It really should have, but it mostly didn’t. There have been a number of occasions when I’ve lost my temper over what I perceived as rampant idiocy during a match and remarked less than politely about it in a video, only to have it pointed out to me by my subscribers that what actually happened was completely different, and I was acting like an arse and should shut up. All of it completely justified. This is one of the main reasons why I don’t do live commentary anymore and record it all from the replays. It’s easy for 75,000 internet detectives to point out my mistakes while reviewing a video frame by frame, not so easy for me when it’s happening live. It took me a good long time to learn to give people the benefit of the doubt if there’s the slightest chance they were acting on information I may not have been aware of, and I still get it wrong from time to time even with the benefit of watching the replay afterwards before I commit any words to video. Luckily I’ve got those 75,000 internet detectives to keep me honest, and they seem to get some kind of perverse pleasure from listening to me rage about the window-lickers anyway. I do try to obscure the names of the victims of my rage now, to at least attempt to preserve their modesty! 5. Are you ever worried about what reaction you’ll get from your viewers? No, never. If I was worried about negative comments I’d never do a critical review of anything. As long as you’re giving what you believe is an honest, balanced opinion, you can’t worry about how people are going to react to what you say or do. No-one ever got anywhere by trying to please all the people all the time. When I first started doing commentaries I was tempted to try to do them in the style of someone famous or popular, but quickly rejected the idea. People can generally spot a fake, and spending so many hours trying to be what you’re not would get very boring very quickly. That’s the advice I always give to new people trying to make a start on YouTube – just be yourself and if you’re good at something, do a lot of it. If people don’t like you for who you are or what you do, it’s no use trying to pretend to be something else. Take the hint and do something else with your time. Or say “screw them” and keep doing it if you enjoy doing it and don’t worry about the view count. I’ve done a couple of videos that I knew in advance were going to attract a storm of hate in the comments and spark multiple flame wars, but I’m never going to pretend I like something just because I’m worried about losing subscribers. I’d rather be honest, give what I hope is a balanced view and if I lose subscribers over it, well… they’re probably the kind of subscribers I could do without anyway. I have had a few subscribers write me very eloquent Private Messages explaining very politely that they’re unsubscribing because they no longer like the material I cover or the way I cover it. That’s absolutely fine. It’s a big internet, there’s a YouTuber out there for everyones’ tastes, but if I’m not the one for you I’m certainly not going waste both our time pretending to be. Unsubscribe, move on, good luck and best wishes. 6. What advice would you give to a newer player to help them improve? Well the first thing I’d tell them to do is go watch http://youtu.be/HX0znHSeDMU- I made it especially for new players but it’s astounding the number of veteran players who told me they learned something new from it, too.**As for general advice I always tell people pay attention to three things: 1.**Your stats are meaningless until you’ve played 3000 to 4000 battles.**Don’t worry about them.**You’re going to be suffering from newbie syndrome until you get past into at least tier 5 tanks, and Continue reading →

More...