Hello everyone, Wargaming RU posted a video, in which they explain, what the PC hardware does when it comes to World of Tanks and how to increase your FPS. Unfortunately, it’s only in Russian (no FPS for you, capitalists!) – but, let’s face it… they need it more :) In any case, here are a few points said in the video, that you might find interesting or helpful. * * - regarding the GPU, the minimum detail requirement is 256 MB VRAM, but for maximum details the requirement is 2GB VRAM - GPU calculates the scene graphics, while the CPU (processor) is responsible for various calculations, like physical model, shell trajectory, client-server communication, sound, HD model track movement etc. - regarding RAM, you need at least 2GB, but if you want to play comfortably, you need 4 GB and more - technically it’s possible to play even with 1GB, but then you’ll get freezes, caused by loading of data from the HDD There is a “recommended settings” button in the setting. It launches two tests: one is testing the processing speed of geometry (CPU), the other the processing speed of textures (GPU). As a result one of five profiles will be selected automatically based on the data recieved. - if the game runs on less than 60 FPS, it’s better not to enable V-sync and Tripple Buffering (in general graphics tab) at all, as both can cause performance loss - some settings have no effect on FPS whatsoever, like the gamma setting, colour filter and its intensity, colorblind mode - theoretically, in fullscreen mode, FPS should be a bit higher (because in window mode the GPU has to render the desktop as well), but in praxis this does not always happen, it really depends on the PC configuration - decreasing game render resolution does increase FPS, try this using (rshift+plus) or (rshift+minus) - the most radical way of increasing FPS is enabling standard graphics (“old render”), which lacks many features of the new (“improved”) one, for example the new render can process up to 1000 light sources, while the old one has only one (the sun), there are differences in anti-aliasing as well, where the old render “smoothens” the entire image (MSAA, CSAA methods) while the new render uses Nvidia technology to smoothen the separate object edges, which is more GPU-requiring. In the future, there will be yet another (better) render implemented – Temporal Anti Aliasing - Field of view influences performance, as the higher it is, the more objects have to be rendered in a frame. Regular human FOV is cca 95 degrees. Large FOV gives you the effect of the tank moving faster, as the objects move faster at the edges of the screen. It’s possible to set minimal and maximal FOV depending on zoom. - regarding texture quality, the highest texture setting is available only in improved render and in 64bit systems, but of course requires more video memory - the best way to optimize shadows is not to switch them off, but to put them on minimal enabled setting (“low”), as they render very effectively that way without performance loss - grass in sniper mode influences both gameplay and performance, cybersports players always disable it - removing additional graphics effects (upper right corner of the advanced graphic settings tab) can improve performance (it removes the quality of explosions and such, you will only see “sparks” and tracers), but it’s better to set them on “low”, so you see the explosions (which help your situational awareness). The real difference between “disabled” and “low” is only several FPS. - vegetation settings regulate the presence of grass and such – on maximum settings, there’s 12 times more grass than on low settings - post-processing handles the post-effects after death, “hot air” shimmering effects and such, this is not recommended for weak computers - track effects deal with mud and water flying off from the tracks, this influences performance only a little - landscape quality sets the distance, at which the quality of landscape gets simplified. On minimal settings, there is a noticeable difference between server and client perception of landscape (basically, you don’t see a terrain feature while it is there), which can lead to you firing and the shell hitting the terrain. Maximum settings do stress the CPU. It is recommended to use at least medium settings. - water quality changes the water render (waves in water and such), decal quality influences the display of “decals”, which are small objects that make the map look realistic, specifically the distance their render at and their quality - object quality setting influences the LOD (level of detail) the objects in the game use – objects in the game have various quality levels (details and such), buildings have 3, tanks have 5. Using the best quality model all the time is not possible, that would influence the performance a lot. Therefore, the further you are from an object, the simplier (lower LOD) object is used. With the maximum setting, the quality models will appear at higher distance, on low settings you will get low LOD at short distances - the same principle applies to tree settings (various LOD, distance at which they display changes) - disabling the leaf render of bushes at short distances (lower left corner) might improve FPS a bit on weak computers - the “render range” setting does NOT influence vehicles – those are always displayed, but it influences less important things, like small objects, trees and such - motion blur is not recommended for weak computers and for PC’s with 30 average FPS or lower - dynamic effects does help in battles with a lot of shit blowing up around you, it just simplifies the effects and sets lower LOD when the FPS drops too low (below 30 FPS), below 10 FPS it disables the effects altogether

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