Author: MaxL_1023 Hello everyone, MaxL_1023 contacted me not so long ago and expressed his interest to actually publish his guides on For the Record. And – I was like, “why not”, looks decent enough. So, this one is about module targetting. Enjoy! - SS The strategy series intends to help tankers build a comprehensive mechanical, tactical and strategic background. As opposed to a few large articles the focus will be on a series of smaller guides covering individual aspects of gameplay. Divided into three primary levels, the series articles will be tailored to players of varying skill to allow a smooth progression into the upper echelons of player ability. This is a dark green level guide representing material which is slightly more complex but is still within the realm of intermediate play. This level is intended for newer or intermediate players who are steadily progressing through the general set of green level material and have integrated most of the more basic skills into their play. This level is also suited for “Dark Green” players looking to begin a push towards Blue Level or “Light Blue” players who are weak in the area covered. The subjects of this tactics guide is Module Targeting. Introduction and Background Thanks to incredible advances in game development, processing power and internet infrastructure (few of which WG uses) WoT incorporates the ability to deal damage in ways other than simply removing HP. If you have made it this far into the strategy series, you (hopefully) know that to destroy a tank you need to reduce its HP to 0. You have also noticed that when taking fire, your vehicle often loses various aspects of performance. Your gun might be disabled, you might not be able to move, or your turret may stop turning. These are serious disabilities which substantially reduce your ability to fight. However, the correlation between these effects and HP loss may seem unclear. Sometimes, you are immobilized without taking damage, other times your turret randomly flies off. At this point, you understand why being able to inflict this kind of “status effect” would help you in game – a disabled tank is much easier to kill, and is less likely to shoot back effectively. The issue (which plagues players of many skill levels) is how to go about doing it. “We’ve lost a track!” This guide will explain the underlying principles of “status effects” and explain what causes them, how to inflict any particular one of them and also explain why half of this process is completely random. Don’t be alarmed though – the most vital hits are also the easiest to inflict. However, before diving into the endless sea of somewhat-sketchy WG programming and balance decisions I will demonstrate how inflicting these disabling effects contributes to teamplay, personal performance and increases the probability of a win. This is your incentive to learn all about “status effects” and how to inflict them – they help you win games, deal more damage and often allow you to contribute in situations where it may otherwise seem hopeless. As you are likely moving through the middle tiers in at least one tank line you will run into these situations often. In these cases, the best you can do is “assisted damage” – damage inflicted by your teammates to a tank you have spotted and/or immobilized. How to deal “Assisted Damage” and why it is Important Starting somewhere in the Devonian period (Patch 8.X) WoT introduced “Assisted Damage” as a recorded metric. Assisted damage refers to damage dealt to an enemy tank which you played a part in inflicting but did not deal directly. The original form of this metric was “spotting damage” – damage dealt to an enemy tank you are spotting by a tank which otherwise would not see it. This is an important metric and is worth studying. However, for now I will focus on the more recently implemented aspect of assisted damage which more directly applies to the aforementioned “status effects.” This is “Damage Assisted by Tracking” – damage dealt to an enemy tank which you immobilized by destroying their tracks. When MM decides to mess with your mind, dealing this form of damage is often the most significant contribution you can make to your team’s local success. Sherman: That Pz. III Blew our Track off! Emil: Thanks Little Buddy! Sherman: FML Tanks in WoT have tracks implemented as an individual module. While I have yet to explain the module system, suffice to say that a hit to a tanks tracks will reliably inflict the “status effect” of being unable to move or turn until the tracks are repaired. The tank can still aim and shoot, so it can still be dangerous to you or your team. However, a de-tracked tank is vulnerable to enemy movement in ways which often drastically reduce its survivability. Assume you are in a Jagdpanzer IV, somewhat behind a largeish blob of both team’s tier 7 and 8 heavies. You are double bushed (in this case Brazilian style is far from optimal) and can therefore fire without expecting to be attacked. The issue is that your recently learned target selection process has you stuck in an infinite loop. Due to enemy positioning and your rather anemic pen (even your APCR has trouble) you can’t even pen enemy weakspots. Say all you can shoot is an IS-3 – even with your 171 APCR pen you are basically shooting a nerf gun. You are not going to deal HP damage. However, you have a high rate of fire and decent damage per shot. In desperation, you aim for the tracks. You de-track the IS-3. With your fast reload you are fully capable of maintaining this condition – even if the IS-3 uses a repair kit you can often re-track it before it can retreat. Now lets analyze what this condition does to the IS-3. Being immobile, it is incapable of retreating into cover while reloading. Therefore, your team can damage it with impunity after it fires a shell. Your damaged teammates can also retreat to a better position without worrying about pursuit. The IS-3′s armor is also highly susceptible to the angle of attack – a hit from as little as 10 degrees off the pike nose allows 175 penetration guns to get through where they would normally fail. The IS-3 can’t turn, so your teammates can move to a better attack angle. In summary, this IS-3 is now dependent on his team to bail him out. Your team has the initiative and a major tactical advantage. Inaccurate tanks and artillery can hit a stationary target much more reliably. Essentially, you Continue reading →

More...