Author: MaxL_1023 Inflicting Module Damage – Internal Modules Internal modules are contained within the main body of the tank. Unlike external modules an AP shell needs to penetrate the surface armor before dealing module damage. HE shells can damage them without penetrating the armor, however they usually inflict less damage due to the majority being absorbed. I am considering crew members to be internal modules – except for a few open-topped TDs the crew are represented by hitboxes entirely within the tank. Internal modules are generally difficult to reliably target – their location varies for each vehicle and generally can’t be determined in battle. However, enough general rules exist to justify studying this area – being able to target engines, ammo racks or gunners especially has a debilitating effect on the enemy tank. I will therefore explain each internal module, where it usually is and what happens when you damage or destroy it. First up: Crew. The Commander The Commander is common to every vehicle in the game. He is almost always located directly under the commander’s cupola. From the front this will appear to be behind the turret face. As it is usually difficult to penetrate the front turret of a vehicle the cupola is your best bet. For tanks with two turret cupolas the second one is usually the gunner, so just pick the easiest one to hit. Usually, the larger cupola houses the commander. Wounding or Killing the Commander has the same effect – the victim loses the majority (~50%) of their view range, loses all relevant skills and perks (including 6th sense until they move it to the radio operator) and also loses the 10% commander bonus to the rest of their crew. Therefore, a tank without a commander is blind, debilitated and won’t know when it is spotted. Therefore, if you have the shot it is generally worth it to try for the commander. Note that the commander has a ~55% chance to make a saving throw resulting in pure HP damage. Only target the commander if you are sure you will hit and penetrate with your shot. Otherwise, try something else. The Gunner The Gunner is common to almost all vehicles – a few have the role merged with another crew member. Either way, the role exists and can be eliminated by well-aimed fire. On most vehicles, the Gunner is located behind the front turret to one side of the gun. If the turret has a commander’s cupola, the gunner is almost always on the opposite side. For tanks with two cupolas, the gunner is generally under the smaller of the two. Wounding or killing the Gunner massively reduces the accuracy and increases the aim time of the enemy tank – it is worse than having a damaged gun and makes it essentially impossible hit an enemy tank at all but facehug range. As with the Commander, killing the Gunner results in the loss of all attached skills and perks. Losing the Gunner is by far the worst crew death – it essentially makes your gun useless. Therefore, the majority of players will use a medkit on their Gunner before even the Commander. Like the Commander, the Gunner has a chance to save the damaged inflicted. Therefore, only try to hit the gunner if you are nearly sure of his location and expect to both hit and penetrate. Otherwise it is better to just shoot where you are most likely to deal HP damage. The Driver The Driver is generally located behind the upper front plate. It is difficult to figure out where exactly the Driver is located. Generally, the Driver is positioned directly behind any slit or hatch in the upper hull, and is underneath any periscope or viewport along the upper edge of the glacis. If there are two viewports then it is basically a dice roll. The driver is usually behind the larger of the viewports (or the one with the hatch) if a discernible difference exists. Wounding or killing the driver results in a decrease in hull traverse and effective engine power. Essentially, the enemy tank will move significantly slower in all directions and on any terrain. A Driver kill is therefore most valuable when the victim is a medium or light tank – heavies are not effected to the same degree as they do not rely on mobility to the same extent. However, I do not recommend targeting the driver unless he is behind a weakspot. Otherwise, you end up trying to penetrate the upper hull. As this is often one of the strongest areas of a vehicle, you are more likely to fail to penetrate. Unless it is a KV or IS series tank a driver shot is not recommended. There is usually a better spot to shoot. The Radio Operator Don’t even bother. Unless the enemy tank is separated by several hundred meters from the nearest ally killing the Radio Operator will have no effect. If the separation exists the enemy is usually dead anyways. The humorous exception is “R2D2″ on the KV-5 – this is the Radioman’s cupola and happens to be a major frontal weakspot. If you are aiming for the radio operator then you probably have better things to do. The Loader The Loader is almost always positioned directly behind the gunner. Wounding or Killing the loader will double the reload time (halving the rate of fire) of the effected vehicle. This is a significant effect, however the gun handling and mobility of the enemy tank are unaffected. Therefore, use of cover can partially negate the loss of DPM. I do not recommend trying for the loader – in most cases when a reliable shot exists you are better off aiming for the roadwheel, engine or ammo rack. Overall, only the Commander and Gunner are usually worth shooting and only then through their particular cupola weakspot. I do not recommend trying for crew damage unless you are very confident in your shell and aim. You are better off trying for a more reliable shot – one where a fewer random dice roles are involved. Internal modules all have that additional saving throw which often negates your aim and prevents module damage. However, there are still internal components which are worth aiming for due to the potential side effects. I will therefore review the rest of the internal modules. The Turret Ring The turret ring is located at the base of the turret. It is visible on the surface on some tanks (Generally American Tanks) but is usually hidden underneath the hull. Damaging the turret ring will half the turret rotation speed – destroying it will Continue reading →

More...